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New kebab marinade takes the industry by storm

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The new kebab marinade developed by Kerry is proving popular in kebab businesses across the country.

Old Town Fish Bar & Kebab House in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, where the owner Huseyin Tarbatugi says the Kerry marinade produces the tasty kebab flavours

One such business is the Old Town Fish Bar & Kebab House in Stevenage, Hertfordshire, where the owner Huseyin Tarbatugi says the marinade produces the tasty kebab flavours that he has sought to achieve throughout his long career.

Huseyin says that preparing the marinades is a skill in itself that usually requires a specialised chef, and that Kerry’s product had made their work much easier.

Another happy customer is Arya Kebab in Croydon, where the owner Mehmet Ali Oget described it as one of the innovations of the kebab sector.

He said it was particularly useful for towns on the outskirts of London and beyond, where good chefs are harder to find. The marinade sauce, Oget says, helps them offer a diverse menu that can rival the best restaurants in central parts of the capital.

Mehmet Ali, the owner of a kebab takeaway in Croydon says the marinade
helps them offer a diverse menu

The story of the marinade began with an idea borne from a visit to several London kebab restaurants by Kerry Sales director Brian MacNeice and account manager Shihaz Siddik.

They noticed something important: these were popular, high-capacity businesses that chose to prepare food using traditional techniques that rely almost entirely on the knowledge and experience of the chef they employ.

Indeed, this is a model used by most takeaway and kebab businesses to prepare their food. The chefs are mostly experts who learned the trade from their parents and elders. They do not even, for instance, measure out spices and oils when preparing meats; they instinctively know the correct quantities in pinches and bunches.

This means that while all restaurants will order the ingredients needed to make a marinade – yogurt, puree, spices, salt and pepper among them – the actual application of the marinade depends on the individual chef’s recipe and preferences.

The absence of standardisation here means even restaurants with strong local brands receive complaints from loyal customers, saying that the taste of their food has changed. Some restaurant owners go further and say the inconsistency and an inadequate workforce is why most businesses struggle to expand or become chain operations.

The Kerry marinade is a liquid marinade sauce sold in two-litre jerry cans for use by food businesses under the familiar “Chicken Train” brand. Chefs can still put a signature spin on the product by supplementing it with spices and yoghurt, if they so wish.

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